Tag Archives: brad keselowski

Don’t have at ’em boys

I’m a big fan of Kyle Busch, although sadly after Friday night even I have to admit that he’s not the Messiah, he’s a very naughty boy. To this Limey he is up there with Lewis Hamilton as the most exciting racer at work in the world today. Every lap Kyle drives is a thrill-ride, there is nothing more entertaining than seeing the number 18 being hustled round by the 26 year old; bouncing off walls and pulling off last gasp wins are his trademarks. Sadly he is also known for crashing, moaning and getting into off-track punch-ups. With nicknames like Wild Thing and Rowdy you know what you are getting, but on Friday night he became stock car racing’s public enemy number one with a shocking display of petulance that would be bad at any time let alone after two weeks of analysing the dangers inherent in racing.

Early on during the Camping World Truck Series race at Texas the arch-villain Kyle Busch was roughed up by a clumsy Ron Hornaday, the veteran meant nothing by the rub and by Nascar standards it was barely even a tickle. In the ensuing caution period Kyle did the unthinkable, pushing himself and Hornaday into the wall with frightening speed. It was enough to damage not just the truck but also the engine in Hornaday’s machine. Worse than that, it took lost Ron a chance at the title. Both Hornaday and his team owner Kevin Harvick had strong words for Busch and rightly so, but instead it was Nascar officials that took it upon themselves to sort this one out. They duly parked Busch for the Nationwide and Sprint Cup races, effectively ending Kyle’s quest for the premier title.

This isn’t quite an unprecedented punishment, but it is certainly an unusual one. Nascar has employed a ‘have at ’em’ rule that goes beyond ‘rubbin’ is racing’ and opens up the possibility of on-track revenge being exacted. Leaving the officiating of driving standards up to adrenaline-pumped young men and women is a disaster for safety but a hit for at least some of Nascar’s many fans. The flaws of one driver hunting down another at 190mph does not need explaining, except to the people who run the sport, or so it seems.

I personally believe that it’s the ‘have at ’em’ rule that should be parked along with Kyle Busch. The list of Nascar racers who have taken revenge using their cars or their fists is a long one, the list of those punished for such actions is somewhat shorter. At Talledega in 2009 Carl Edwards and Brad Keselowski came together in the most almighty shunt that scattered debris into the crowd. Was this a warning that even fans were in being placed in danger by over-aggressive driving? Not to Nascar it seems, they proceeded to let Carl and Brad carry a grudge onto the racetrack on more than one occasions since then, including this massive airbourne wreck last year. A totally unacceptable state of affairs.

If we hadn’t have had such a horrid few weeks for motorsport I suspect Kyle’s stupidity wouldn’t have been punished by anything other than Ron Hornaday’s fists. However much I enjoy seeing the Wild Thing at work, I’m glad Nascar has taken a stand. I just hope that some sensible rules are drawn up that outlaws racing revenge all year round. If that doesn’t happen then we are just counting down the days until somebody does something that they truly regret. In such a litigious country I would picture that Nascar could find itself in a massive legal case if a non-accidental wreck results in casualties, which despite SAFER walls and HANS devices it could very well do. Now it is up to Nascar to make bans such as Kyle’s a standard punishment for all drivers, not just the ones playing the role of ‘baddie’ and nor should it just be a card that is played in sensitive times. No matter how large or small the wreck is, whether it is behind the pace car or under green, this cannot go on – it may come to threaten the entire sport.

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Another fast-Seb, Danica’s milestone

 

Sebastian Ogier

Sebastian Ogier has the name, the car and the talent. (pic Edgar Gonzales)

Once again it was the USA that brought us most of the racing action this week, but the French provided the flair. Nascar was in action in Las Vegas, Grand Am had a thriller at Homestead and the WRC’s new breed were in Top Gear’s favourite country.

 

Carl Edwards did his somersault celebrations after taking the win in Sprint Cup at Las Vegas, but the Nationwide encounter had more talking points. The last lap saw reigning champion Brad Keselowski leading the way until a puncture sent him into the wall on the final lap gifting the win to 50-something hip hop aficionado Mark Martin.

 

Behind the thrilling events up front a little Nascar history was made by Danica Patrick. She took fourth, the highest for a woman at this level of stock car competition, in what was her most impressive drive to date in Nascar. This was a significant milestone, coupled with the last-gasp spills it means Nationwide in Vegas gets my race of the week.

 

Danica Patrick may have carved out a little piece of history, but the drive remained a solid rather than spectacular effort. To see elbows-out, white-knuckle action you had to head off the tarmac and onto the dust of Mexico or to the ice of the Stade de France.

 

The World Rally Championship with its new itty-bitty cars headed to Central America where a glance at the results wouldn’t tell you the whole story. Sebastian Loeb, one of greatest driving talents at work in the world today, took the win to add to his record-smashing tally, but the real star of the show was another Citroen-driving Frenchman called Sebastian. Winner of one WRC round already, Sebastian Ogier is being groomed to replace the master and he nearly got one over the champ as they tussled against each other until Ogier made a mistake on the final day.

 

The rest of the WRC field lagged minutes behind the two Sebastians despite the Frenchmen starting most stages in seemingly disadvantageous conditions. Sebastian Ogier nearly matched the performance of Loeb, which is enough to earn the young star twoworld’s racer of the week.

 

There was further French frivolity in the Stad de France where the Professor taught the class a lesson in ice dancing as Alain Prost won in the Andros Trophy. He seems to smile a lot more when he wins on ice than he ever did on tarmac, the Paris crowds were happy with the result too.

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Filed under Andros Trophy, Nascar, Rally, Sports Cars

What’s the point?

 

BSB riders give chase - new points systems are all the rage (pic MSV)

In the past you needed to be Watson the supercomputer to work out who scored what in a Nascar race, now the Sprint Cup has adopted a new points formula that should be easier to comprehend for those like myself whose brains freeze when faced with any more than a couple of digits. So it’s 43 points for the win, a solitary point for last and you can guess the rest. Throw in a point for leading a lap (always a great incentive for action) and another point for leading the most laps (always a well earned point) and there you have the new system. Simples.

So things are easier to follow, but the Sprint Cup is only claimed after the season’s ending series of 10 races known as The Chase. Played out on dull ‘cookie cutter’ tracks, the top 12 drivers have their points almost equalised and only these chosen few can race for the title. Not so simples.

Jimmie Johnson has claimed the last five straight Sprint Cups, timing his push to the top 12 perfectly every time while other stock car superstars are left fighting over the scraps. So can Jimmie still win under this new system? Of course he can, he’s the complete driver with a shrewd crew chief and the best team in the business, but at least we may see some more representative results for strong drivers who have missed the Chase in the past such as win-a-holic Kyle Busch or King of Concrete Carl Edwards.

Last year British Superbikes adopted their own Chase-style system, branded as The Showdown, that saw Riuchi Kionari taking the crown at a thrilling final round at Oulton Park. Nobody doubts the quality of the Japanese rider, so it’s certainly worked for the BSB and looks set to stay. It’s also a hell of a lot better than Bernie’s silly medals idea he keeps going on about ever since he took his little trip to Beijing with the Blairs back in 2008.

For what it’s worth I’m not a fan of a Chase format that freezes out riders and drivers. It’s nice to see a championship develop over the course of a season. But what do I know, I’m still stuck with the opinion that the only proper points in F1 are the top six.

The Chase seems fairly popular on the Nascar scene, so the current talking point is the weird scenario that the top three series are all being led by drivers who didn’t win during Speedweeks as it was part-time interlopers Waltrip, Stewart and Bayne who struck gold. Only giving points to regulars was a response to Sprint Cup drivers scooping the honours in feeder series, such as Brad Keselowski’s title success in Nationwide last year.

I think it’s a truly wonderful thing that Nascar has drivers guesting across its various formulas – it gave us a truly feel-good story with Trevor Bayne’s big win last Sunday. It provides feats to marvel at such as Kyle Busch winning more races in one year than you could count on your fingers and toes. Some of the greatest races on two wheels have been ridden by wildcards, I only wish that F1 would lighten up and allow a Rossi or a Loeb to join the grid once in a while.

Today Indycar announced a massive prize-fund for their Las Vegas season finale to encourage some series-swapping, a move in the right direction for the new management of the series. A cheque for $5 million will be given to any guest driver who claims the win; what price Mario dusting off his overalls? “Oh boy,” tweeted Marco Andretti, “if my grandfather finds this out we will be a 5 car team!”

The Nascar debate about guys who finished second and third leading the way is a moot point – it’s great that they have guest drivers competing in the first place. And the fact we can even have this discussion without picking up a calculator is a success for the simplified points system.

After Nascar hits the desert in Phoenix and Vegas over the next couple of weeks the charts will doubtless look a little cleaner and those sensitive souls who are troubled by the scoring anomalies thrown up by the thrilling events of Speedweeks will have forgotten the current odd look of the tables. However the memorable feats of Waltrip, Stewart and Bayne will be imprinted on the minds of the fans forever.

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Filed under Indycars, Nascar, Superbikes